The Decade In Porn: Courtney Trouble Looks Back On 2000-2009
(via fleshbot)

Adult entertainment in 2009 looks a whole lot different than it did in 1999. In your opinion, what’s been the single biggest change this decade?
I’m young, so the past ten years of porn have really been all I’ve truly experienced, but I’ve got to say that in the past ten years, I have seen so many independent porn ventures rise and fall on the internet. A good few of them, including my site NoFauxxx.Com, have really succeeded in creating a long-term brand and legacy, while others came and go like night clubs. With this whole do-it-yourself dot.com take on pornography, I think many subcultures have been able to create, sell, and experience pornography, which I could be wrong but I don’t think that was happening in the 80s or 90s. Porn has really moved away from something that lives, breaths, and does payroll in “Porn Valley” and become somethign that anybody can do, and making a living from, all over the world. I think the single biggest change has been not just the internet, but the internet’s ability to let subcultures and independant pornographers reach worldwide audiences, making limitless room for creative pornography projects. The big companies can complain all they want about how the internet has killed their profits, but the plus side is that people like me have a chance to do our work and gain visibility.

You launched NoFauxxx in 2002. What was the industry like back in those days? What motivated you to start your own site?
I dind’t have much part in the “Industry” until much more recently. Back in 2002, I was 19, living in Olympia as a tiny Riot Grrrl nugget, and rebellious against not only mainstream porn but alt porn that wasn’t inclusive of people of larger sizes, varied genders, or racially diverse. SG lived in Portland and was still considered the most empowering porn out there, and it still didn’t feel like enough – and that was really the motivation behind starting the site. The term “Queer Porn” didn’t exists what-so-ever, even though a few things like Ssspread.Com and SIR Productions were making what I would consider “queer porn” back in the day. But nobody called it that until No Fauxxx hit the scene. So, for me, I was creating images for fun, not realising that what I was doing was creating a genre for my work and others to follow.

How has NoFauxxx changed over the years?
It started out as such a tiny site, with just me and a few of my brave friends from Olympia. I was a phone sex operator and was really obsessed with having a balance of “fantasy” and “reality” in my work, so No Fauxxx became an outlet for me to make erotic art that showed the “reality” of the sexuality in my community. The photos were DIY digital on a bulky Nikon CoolPix, couldn’t get them much larger than 600 pixels, and didn’t even own a light set, studio props, or a video camera. I shot people’s “realness,” asked them to be themselves, and shot in very natural, intimate places. The goal of realness is still a factor these days, but there’s a lot more tools of the trade and high-concept storyline on my set these days. I still really love shooting someone masturbating with no makeup on, that will never change – but I’ve evolved to use better tools to get that done.

Read the whole Interview here: The Decade In Porn: Courtney Trouble Looks Back On 2000-2009  (via Fleshbot)